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Page history last edited by PBworks 12 years ago

"You Don't Always Die From Tobacco..."

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A long way has come from the times of the Malboro man ads.  To me it seems that I hardly see ads or commercials promoting cigarettes, however, on the other hand there has become an overwhelming amount of recent ads warning us about tobacco and cigarettes.  The central problem behind this Truth ad is that millions of people die from tobacco use every year.  "Around 5.4 million deaths a year are caused by tobacco, and every 6.5 seconds a current or former smoker dies" (Smoking Deaths Worldwide).  What this ad tries to focus on is that not everyone dies from tobacco.  Although tobacco is one of the leading cause of death, most of the time it is not the direct cause.  Tobacco use leads to cancer (lungs, mouth, etc.) and cancer more often than not leads to death.  For those lucky enough to beat cancer, might still have to deal with the consequences of being a lifetime smoker as portrayed in the ad where the man has a hole in his neck. 

 

This image is disturbing for people to see and what this ads plans to do is open the eyes of everyone out there on what tobacco can do by providing a first-hand look.  This is one of the many Truth ads that have been "popping up" on our television sets.  The message that is sent out is that it wants to stop and hopefully prevent people from ever taking that first "puff".  Like I mentioned earlier, times have changed since the Malboro man ad was so popular and now advertisement agencies have to appeal to a different crowd.  Nowadays, instead of using a "cowboy" to appeal to men and get them to smoke this ad shows another "cowboy" (a Neo-Neocowboy if you will) singing a song with a whole in his neck.  This is a good example how the same image and character are used to promote different sides of an issue.

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